September 20, 2014

Time to retire from online learning?

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Working in my study

Working in my study

Forgive me for being personal in this post (well, it is a blog), but I also have a few important things to say professionally.

The context

I was 75 yesterday and as I’ve tried to do each birthday for the last 25 years, I spent the day skiing at Whistler. (A wonderful day: sunshine and still tons of snow, and a lot of terrain to cover). How to spend yesterday was an easy decision. The hard one is how to spend the rest of my life (yeah, welcome to the club).

In particular, I have decided to stop (nearly) all professional activities from now onwards. I want to go through the reasons for this, because the reasons are as much professional as personal. Also this change has implications for my blog in particular.

What I’m not going to do

In general, I’m not going to accept any invitations to do paid consultancy work nor to accept invitations to be a keynote speaker or a participant at conferences from now on. I will not be taking on any more thesis supervision or examinations, nor reviewing articles or books for publication, unless they are directly relevant to my own writing (see below). I say in general, because it’s stupid to be inflexible, but there will not be many exceptions.

Why stop now?

First, if 75 is good enough for judges in Canada to retire, it’s sure good enough for me, and after 45 years continuously working in online and distance education, I’ve certainly earned the right to stop. However, many people just don’t believe me (including my wife), because online learning and open and distance education are my passion and my life, and that’s not going to go away. As the day spent skiing illustrates, I’m really fortunate to be healthy and fit, so health is not the reason. But there are good reasons for me to stop now, and I want to share these with you.

The main reason for stopping now is that I want to stop when I am still at my best. I’ve been really on form over the last 12 months, as far as one can be objective about these things. But I have seen far too many great people who continued long after they should have stopped – and unfortunately it’s the later years that people often remember. Much of my expertise comes from having done things: teaching online, managing a department. But it’s over 10 years since I taught a full course, and a similar amount of time since I was responsible for a department. Given the pace of change, it is dangerous for a consultant to become adrift from the reality of teaching and management. It’s time to hang up my boots before I get really hurt (or more importantly, really hurt others).

Related to this is the difficulty in keeping up in this area of knowledge. It’s a full-time job just to keep abreast of new developments in online and distance learning, and this constant change is not going to go away. It’s tempting to say that it’s only the technology that changes; the important things – teaching and learning – don’t change much, but I don’t believe that to be true, either. Teaching in higher education is about to go through as major a revolution as one can imagine. This is not going to be easy; indeed it could get brutal.

Even the processes of learning, which used to be relatively stable, given how much is biological, are also undergoing change. Technology is not neutral; it does change the way we think and behave. Furthermore, I foresee major developments in the science of learning that will have major implications for teaching and learning – but it will also have major false directions and mistakes (be very careful with artificial intelligence in particular). So this is a field that needs full-time, professional application, and very hard work, and I just don’t have the energy any more to work at that level. To put it simply, this is not a profession where you can be half in and half out. Dabbling in online learning is very dangerous (politicians please note).

And then there’s MOOCs. I can’t express adequately just how pissed off I am about MOOCs – not the concept, but all the hubris and nonsense that’s been talked and written about them. At a personal level, it was as if 45 years of work was for nothing. All the research and study I and many others had done on what makes for successful learning online were totally ignored, with truly disastrous consequences in terms of effective learning for the vast majority of participants who took MOOCs from the Ivy League universities. Having ignored online learning for nearly 20 years, Stanford, MIT and Harvard had to re-invent online learning in their own image to maintain their perceived superiority in all things higher educational. And the media fell for it, hook, line and sinker. This is a battle I no longer want to fight – but it needs fighting. But my reaction did make me wonder, am I just an old man resisting the future? And that has definitely left a mark.

Lastly, I am concerned that the computer scientists seem to be taking over online education. Ivy League MOOCs are being driven mainly by computer scientists, not educators. Politicians are looking to computer science to automate learning in order to save money. Computer scientists have much to offer, but they need more humility and a greater willingness to work with other professionals, such as psychologists and teachers, who understand better how learning operates. This is a battle that has always existed in educational technology, but it’s one I fear the educators are losing. The result could be disastrous, but that’s a theme for a whole set of blog posts.

So yes, time to go, and to leave the good fight to the next generation.

What I will continue to do

I will continue to write. In particular, I have already started writing an open textbook on ‘Teaching in a Digital Age’, and when that is done, I will write a semi-autobiographical novel (only the names will be changed to protect the innocent). I will also complete any existing professional commitments.

I will also continue this blog focused on online learning, but it will be more journalistic and less based on my immediate and recent experiences in online learning. So I hope it will continue to be of interest and value.

And yes, plenty of golf, and more time with family.

Last words

This post has ended up being a bit too personal. But it’s been an incredible, wonderful 45 years. Open and distance education are honourable fields of endeavour, aimed at widening access. Online learning is an exciting field, constantly under development, and has huge potential for both increasing the quality of teaching and the productivity of higher education. Above all, though, the journey has brought me many marvellous and true friends and colleagues. It has been an honour and a privilege to work with such great people. Thank you all.

Comments

  1. Amazing post Tony. I have followed your work religiously since I got into online education 5 years ago. It has been great to see distance education through your eyes. Good luck and don’t worry, we will pick up the fight from here.

    • Colin Latchem says:

      I was surprised to learn that you had decided to hang up your boots. As they say, “Old soldiers never die; they just fade away” and you were one of the early foot soldiers leading the way between the trenches, right back to the days of events such as the UK Educational Television Association conferences at the University of York. I’ll always remember our being speakers at the launch of the Korea National Open University videoconferencing network and you being in full flight when the South Korean equivalent of a JCB cut through the main powerline outside the building, plunging us all in darkness. A salutary warning of the fine line we walk in matters such as online learning. I am glad to see that your retirement won’t mean the end of your blogs and book writing. Ab ove maiori discit arare minor (From the older ox the younger learns to plough).

  2. Thanks for sharing this personal and reflective post Tony. Your words of wisdom and insight are a true inspiration. I look forward to reading your upcoming material!

  3. Congratulations on retirement. I’m glad to hear you’ll keep writing, because I learn so much from you. Thank you for everything: for helping to blaze a field, for asking important questions, for making keen observations. Enjoy the time with the family. Well deserved.

  4. Hi Tony – congrats on this tough decision. It’s obvious that you have enormous passion for online and distance learning. Over the past several years, your reflections of this blog have been important for the suddenly discovered field of online learning. Best wishes as you make some personal transitions. Keep skiing, flying, golfing, spending time with family, and whatever else you do in your spare time! Your contributions to the field of online learning have been enormous and set a standard that will be hard for anyone to match. Thank you.

    George

  5. Lindsey Annison says:

    Please do not stop writing. Or skiing! There are many in the forthcoming generation who need your sagacity to overcome some of the obstacles you rightly foresee in online ed and learning.

    Enjoy your free time and thank you.

  6. Tian Belawati says:

    Dear Tony,
    I am sad yet so happy for you, and also so happy that you will keep writing. I wish you to have a peaceful, happy and healthy retirement. I hope one day you will find a good reason to visit me in Indonesia, it’s not far from Vancouver, only on the other side of the Pacific Ocean. Thank you Tony for everything you’ve done in the 45 years of your professional life, and personally also for being a wonderful supervisor and friend. Enjoy your time with Pat and your grandchildren.

  7. Dear Tony – I never had the opportunity to meet you in person – but your blogs and writing have informed my journey as a scholar in open distance and e-learning from the start. I can only support what Audrey has said in her post – we are indebted to you. Enjoy your retirement.

  8. Thank you for your work. Wise words. The media don’t fall for it – they are complicit in the system. Retreat is often the most appropriate strategy when faced by superior forces. Guerilla action will continue. Ski well!

  9. Yikes, Tony. After i heard you kick ass at UBC last week, I thought it was a prelude to the next phase…

    However, this plays out… we will all truly miss your leadership and reasoned voice.

    Best wishes, Tony.

    d

  10. Sam Sharma says:

    Tony, All the best for your great plans ahead.
    Regarding MOOCs and the like, you nailed it!
    It is relieving when scholars/teachers like you tell it like it is. For younger professionals, it is shocking to see how it is becoming more difficult to say very simple things like this: “psychologists and teachers . . . understand better how learning operates.” Teacher-bashing–in the name of critiquing “resistance” etc–has become a new normal; but, strangely, it is not as cool to call bad educational ideas coming out “Stupid Valley” bad ideas. When I came across the word “fight” toward the end of Bates’s post, I wondered how many tech-heads who are dominating conversations about education today might read that word as “resistance against change” rather than “defending serious ideas and effective practices” against the onslaught of mediocrity. I think the problem underlying what Bates discusses is that people who have vested interest in “disrupting” education for non-educational reasons can get away with defining teachers on the basis of the worst traits among teachers, whereas they enjoy the new fashion of being defined (and defining themselves) on the basis of their best, most advanced, futuristic ideas. It is as if teachers they specialize in the future, as well as stupid ideas that they get to sell as smart. In reality, when it comes to educational technologies in the current environment (in the mainstream), it is far more common for professional technologists to be full of bad teaching ideas than teachers to be full of bad technological ideas. Maybe I’m surrounded by too many tech savvy teachers who also get pissed off when they encounter bogus.

  11. “X”tubee U.H.

    She saw, copy. You see paste?

    K.L.

  12. Terry Hilsberg says:

    Tony,

    Excellent post.

    As you correctly note, we are currently going through a re-discovery and re-shaping of online and distance education history.

    Unfortunately, as they say, the history will be written by the winners.

    Nevertheless, this post is an important contribution to trying to make the history accurate.

    FWIIW, as a business person, my guess is that most of the recent USA market entrants, with Ivy League backing, have had to undergo a baptism of fire and in most cases have had a reality adjustment.

    The metric that they face, which academics, on the other hand, in most cases do not, is “lack of sales equals death”, whether sudden or disguised. This forces business model adjustment.

    Look forward to seeing you again in “retirement ” in either China or Australia.

    Regards,

    Terry
    http://www.sydedutech.org

  13. Hi Tony,
    I agree that you are leaving on a high. Your “Vision 2020″ post was used by us in the Open University (UK) recently as background reading ahead of our workshop to develop the Open University L&T strategy for 2025. This is one of many indicators of the relevance of your work int he field of online learning. I agree that the educators are being ignored in the current hype surrounding open learning at scale. It’s very important that people do continue to speak up against the ‘technology first’ brigade. You’ve inspired others to do that. Happy retirement.

  14. Carole Hunter says:

    Dear Tony
    One of the truly wonderful things about online learning is that you can impact on people you have never met, from all over the world. I’ve followed your work for many years now, and have learned much from your thoughts and insights. You’ll be sorely missed…but I’m incredibly glad to hear you won’t completely disappear.

    A very sincere thank you for all you have shared so generously, so wisely.

    Enjoy the golf!

    Carole

  15. Mark Curcher says:

    Dear Tony
    It is with very mixed feelings that I write this comment. Happy for you to be able to spend time with family walk away with head high from the battles yet to be fought, yet I am alos sad and concerned about the future of online and distance education. This is such a great post for the issues it raises and I wonder where the ‘next generation’ is and who they are. Thank you for your work over the last 45 years.

  16. Muchas gracias por sus continuas y magníficas enseñanzas. Seguro que desde la comunidad hispana seguiremos disfrutando en su blog de sus fundadas y valiosas opiniones. Enjoy your time and well deserved break.

  17. Julia Hengstler says:

    Thank you for your many contributions to the field. I read your books in my Master of Arts classes, was able to attend a few seminars you ran in Vancouver, & continued to read your work as I moved through my roles as distributed learning teacher, then educational technologist, and more recently, online professor in the OLTD program at VIU.
    I hope you enjoy your liberated time, but I will look forward to your more journalistic approach and for your perspective on new developments. You have a valuable perspective carrying the weight of much history & experience which can help frame and ground how we view new developments.

  18. Eric Martel says:

    Thank you for your outstanding contributions to the field of distance learning. This retirement is well deserved!

  19. Thanks Tony for all that you have done in this space. Your writing has been (and will continue to be) a huge inspiration.

  20. Congratulations, Tony! Your comments are a powerful exit statement after a powerful career. I do hope you will be like Frank Sinatra and George Burns, though, and keeping coming back into the fray – because I do like the question mark on the title of your piece. Jon.

  21. Hi Tony -

    I like this retirement that continues to work ;-) Your writings are work, and probably one that you enjoy, otherwise you wouldn’t be doing it. We’re all happy that you enjoy it, and hopefully many years we have reading these wonderful posts… Happy birthday!

    –Stella.

  22. I don’t know how many times I’ve thought: What would Tony say about this? You have been the thread of useful and valuable contributions to the field. New topics, new technologies, old idea presented as new ones, bad applications of new ideas… and you’re always there to remind everyone what is important. So grateful you will continue to write!

  23. Tony, I’m sorry that you’re retiring – from a purely selfish reason, of course! You are a great resource, and I’m glad to hear you’ll still have your toe in the water, so to speak. Enjoy the time with your family and on the golf course – the best is still in front of you!

  24. Paul Hibbitts says:

    The first time we crossed paths at UBC in the late 1990′s it was regrettably too short, but I am so glad that we were able to re-connect more recently. In the past few years, your various talks in Vancouver and your numerous blog posts have been a great source of learning and inspiration, and I really look forward to reading both of your upcoming books. All the best to you and your family, and a happy belated birthday!

  25. Debbie Morrison says:

    Thank you Tony for sharing your work, insights and expertise on online learning. You are a voice of reason, in a chaotic time of technological advancements and the shake-up of traditional methods in education.

    I wish you all the best in your retirement. Enjoy!

  26. Dear Tony – congratulations on a distinguished career and your decision to retire at 75. Life’s too short and there’s so much more to it than working. Enjoy your retirement. Thanks for the 2 online grad courses I took with you at UBC. I’m glad that I was able to meet you when you came to Toronto. I will look forward to your book on Teaching in the Digital Age, because that’s what I continue to do – teach online. I couldn’t agree with you more about the hubris of the Ivy Leagues and what they’ve done to online learning with MOOCs. As H.L. Mencken said, ““There is no idea so stupid that you can’t find a professor who will believe it.” Best wishes in your retirement……Alex Kuskis

  27. Lesley @cioccas says:

    Your paragraph about MOOCs exactly reflects my thoughts about MOOCs. Glad to hear it coming from a leader in the online and distance learning field, as this type of voice has been swamped by the unquestioning embracing of MOOCs by all and sundry!
    Pleased to hear that you’re not retiring from writing, look forward to more!

  28. Just a small comment to simply say thank you Tony.

    Contribution can be measured in so many ways but the highest compliment I can pay you is that you hve been a constant source of education and learning for me personally and for that I am eternally grateful.

  29. Conrad J. Noll says:

    Tony, I have followed your work and listened to you at many conferences over the years. You have put your finger on exactly the issues I would have identified.

    The bottom line is we don’t need the computer scientists or the ivy league schools. They are the ones who should feel threatened and I believe they do on several levels.

    Good educators who recognize their role as learners have all the technology tools they need readily at hand to engage with students. In the 80s when I first became involved in developing technology for learning we had to do it all from scratch. Nowadays it is plug and play in comparison. IMHO it’s sandbox time for web-savvy educators despite the efforts to enclose the commons. Even those evil schemes may be co-opted in the pursuit of the good in open learning. the real enemy is the claim on time that being associated with any institution demands.

    Enjoy your well earned laurels Tony. You have been a giant in the field.

  30. Pierre GEDEON says:

    Hello from Lebanon and thank you Tony. Don’t forget to Come skiing in Lebanon near the césars, because You,Stephen and George are three new cedars for the “Open human “.

  31. Som Naidu says:

    So “No” to somethings but “YES” to other things. As Jon observed, the question mark in the title of your blog is intriguing. Seems like we haven’t heard the last of Tony Bates yet. I get the feeling that we are going to see you around the traps, perhaps not in the usual places, but in other more interesting places. Happy Birthday Tony… and good on ya!!!. All the best!!

    Som

  32. Tony

    You are young for your age. We shall miss you active input, i know we still find online. You have inspired and educated me alot in this area of elearning. I enjoy your write ups and use them heavily as reference material. Enjoy your skiing.

  33. Tony, this is a great post. I wish you a wonderful time, with less duty and more choice :-)

    You’re absolutely right about MOOCs, It’s a battle between computer scientists and educators. We’re a few educators fighting to save and enhance the pedagogical value of e-learning. But it’s hard. We have the expertise, they have the money. I hope we can understand each others, but we need confidence and common objectives. Battle of MOOC is very, very hard. For every good course, there are so many poor ones. But we’ll go on :-)

    Thank you for all what you gave to the distance learning movement. Thank you for all you gave me, through your posts.

  34. David Hawkridge says:

    Tony, congratulations and best wishes from Druuske and me as you turn the corner (not over the hill). We’re there, just ahead of you! And we remember you, all the way back to 1970.

    David

  35. Thank you for your body of work so generously shared for so many years, and for your patience with enthusiastic open education rookies. I’m about to hit 50, but I discovered distance and open learning quite late in life. I’m pleased to think that I might have 25 good years of teeth-grinding, passion-driven frustration to keep me humble and focused on fighting the good fight. I look forward to continuing to read as much as you’re willing to write.

  36. Julià Minguillón says:

    great post, Tony

    thank you for your guidance during the days you spent at UOC, I personally learnt a lot

    best

    Julià

  37. Thanks Tony for a great posting here! I especially appreciated hearing your thoughts and feelings…the personal side of things.

    Like the other commentators above, I wanted to say ***thank you*** for all that you have done in helping people develop their learning ecosystems in a variety of ways over the years. I, too, am passionate about online learning. So I have really appreciated your insights and writings about topics that related to online and distance learning. Thanks again Tony! And like the others, I’m glad that you will continue to write in the future.

    Peace be with you and yours,
    Daniel Christian

  38. Zacarias Chamberlain says:

    Tony Bates..as human you are reference..in distance learning you are a monk…more than reference.. and, yes your text is sad….MOOC’s are massive as vacines…as political campaing….massive is against the individual behavior.
    I’m not a educator, I’m a Engineer that teached in the last 32 years….Teaching and learning are very diferent things, the goal is to connect the teaching with the learning, no matter which technique is used. My expectation for your new book. Congratulations, you are not out, just go see the things in a whole new way.
    Congratulations!!! ( Passo Fundo, Brazil)

  39. Congratulations on a decision my wife keeps urging me to make – but I think she’s only kidding :) I am only 73 (except when she forbids me to go to Nigeria any more – more atrocities recently).
    Anyway, if you keep writing, as you say you will, then that’s not retiring.
    I look forward to your next book.
    You look out for mine within the year. And if you are still editing the Routledge series for Open & Flexible Learning, please beg them to stop removing the cell borders in tables (gaps are not enough) and insisting on commas after authors’ surnames and full stops after their initials (gaps are enough in this case).
    Finally, I do hope the digital age does not continue to ignore the 66% of the population with no access to the Internet (World internet usage, June 2012, http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats.htm), many of whom do have access to television and radio and cassette/CD players and postal provision for printed materials.
    My very best wishes

  40. Peter Sloep says:

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us on what must have been a difficult decision. There’s is something to be learned from your wisdom here, for many of us, myself not the least.

    But above all, thanks for having been so influential shaping distance education in its many forms and guises. We would not have been where we are now if it hadn’t been for you (and a few others ;-). If only the MOOCies would understand that ….

    Peter

  41. Thanks for sharing Tony and thanks for everything–you’ve been a digital elearning mentor for years.
    Best wishes in retirement. Looking forward to your books!
    Kevin

  42. How does one decide when one is at one’s peak? Is it reallly age related? Some people peak in their twenties and some in their eighties. So we don’t necessarily agree with you there! Your astute insights and intellgent analysis are unique, there is no-one out there to take your place, which will leave those of us grappling with complex issues much the poorer without your observations to draw on. So, if youi decide to change your mind, after taking a break, we will be happy. If not, let me join the many voices expressing heartfelt thanks for your exemplary role as a sensible and nuanced analyst and a fine interpreter of the changing terrain.

  43. Hi Tony. Thanks for the advice you’ve given me in the last few years. I don’t agree with you on everything, but when someone you admire disagrees with you, it forces you to really critically examine your own views and that has been invaluable to me. Enjoy your retirement, but keep writing and keep us on our toes.

    Brian

  44. Stephen Brown says:

    Hi Tony, you will be missed, but you have done more than your bit and you can be rightly proud of the impact you have had. It was a huge privilege to have the opportunity to work for you all those years ago at the OU and to have followed your work over the years. Thank you for being such an inspiration and wise guide. And best wishes for a happy retirement.
    Stephen

  45. Hi Tony,

    Now that I started with 49 years old a Master at UOC and I had you as my prefered guru you retired. I’m going to ask the University for refund my money :-)

    As many others from Indonesia and Lebanon, I also invite you (and your wife) to come to Galicia (Northwest of Spain) not for skiing but for doing many other leisure activities.

    Thanks for all your research and for sharing your knowledge with all of us. Enjoy your new life and keep posting in your blog.

    Toni Soto

  46. Janice Picard says:

    Tony you were a significant presence when I started out in distance learning field in the early 1980s and I still recall how excited I was to spend a week with you at the Open University. You’ve accomplished so much over the years and have been an inspiration to many, including myself. I’m hope you’ll have time to celebrate your retirement over a nice bottle of wine, I remember your favorite, the next time I’ve in Vancouver. Hope to see you this coming summer.

  47. Gila Kurtz says:

    Thank you for the good work and your professional guidance. I learnt much from you.

  48. Josep M Duart says:

    Thnak’s for your you job, Tony, and for your guidance. I learned a lot from you!

    All the best

    Josep M Duart

  49. Online learning has no age. I was surprised to learn about yours. I’m glad you will devote your time to writing and doing service to yourself.

  50. Hey Tony!

    Happy Birthday! I trust that you had a great one, as always. I want to express my birthday wishes and also to add my voice to the very very many who will miss your thoughtful, highly informed and deep commitment to the field of online education as you have announced your retirement. I share their celebration of your contribution to our field and also the sadness that you are reducing your active participation, at least in terms of travel.

    The field will miss you. Terribly. Perhaps more than most can imagine or realize. There are so few voices with such honesty and such impact who have contributed so profoundly to online education. You have given your scholarship, your time, and your heart to the field. Man, we need more people like you, not fewer. I thank you for your great blog, your writings, your workshops and of course your wonderful speeches. I am certain that you have inspired a new generation of researchers and practitioners to take up the worthy banner of fighting for all that online education could and should be.

    I am so glad that you and I moved to Vancouver in the same month, year, (and street) 25 years ago so that I can continue to look forward to enjoying your company and conversation, with a lovely bottle of wine. And of course to follow your blog and your further thoughts and adventures.

    With great affection and respect,
    Linda
    XX

Trackbacks

  1. […] Bates has been seriously kicking ass for many years. He’s decided to retire – and he deserves it. I can’t even imagine how much energy he’s dedicated to the […]

  2. […] included in his retirement post these paragraphs on MOOCs (and for some reason, I wasn’t able to copy and paste the actual […]

  3. […] Tony Bates, one of the foremost academics working around online and distance education, wrote a blog post  announcing his retirement. He’s had a long, productive, and highly valuable career, and very […]

  4. […] I was 75 yesterday and as I’ve tried to do each birthday for the last 25 years, I spent the day skiing at Whistler. (A wonderful day: sunshine and still tons of snow, and a lot of terrain to cover). How to spend yesterday was an easy decision. The hard one is how to spend the rest of my life (yeah, welcome to the club).In particular, I have decided to stop (nearly) all professional activities from now onwards. I want to go through the reasons for this, because the reasons are as much professional as personal. Also this change has implications for my blog in particular.In general, I’m not going to accept any invitations to do paid consultancy work nor to accept invitations to be a keynote speaker or a participant at conferences from now on. I will not be taking on any more thesis supervision or examinations, nor reviewing articles or books for publication, unless they are directly relevant to my own writing (see below). I say in general, because it’s stupid to be inflexible, but there will not be many exceptions. Read full article […]

  5. […] Time to retire from online learning? – Tony Bates […]

  6. […] Time to retire from online learning? […]

  7. […] I was 75 yesterday and as I’ve tried to do each birthday for the last 25 years, I spent the day skiing at Whistler. (A wonderful day: sunshine and still tons of snow, and a lot of terrain to cover). How to spend yesterday was an easy decision. The hard one is how to spend the rest of my life (yeah, welcome to the club).In particular, I have decided to stop (nearly) all professional activities from now onwards. I want to go through the reasons for this, because the reasons are as much professional as personal. Also this change has implications for my blog in particular.In general, I’m not going to accept any invitations to do paid consultancy work nor to accept invitations to be a keynote speaker or a participant at conferences from now on. I will not be taking on any more thesis supervision or examinations, nor reviewing articles or books for publication, unless they are directly relevant to my own writing (see below). I say in general, because it’s stupid to be inflexible, but there will not be many exceptions. Read full article […]

  8. […] I was 75 yesterday and as I’ve tried to do each birthday for the last 25 years, I spent the day skiing at Whistler. (A wonderful day: sunshine and still tons of snow, and a lot of terrain to cover). How to spend yesterday was an easy decision. The hard one is how to spend the rest of my life (yeah, welcome to the club).In particular, I have decided to stop (nearly) all professional activities from now onwards. I want to go through the reasons for this, because the reasons are as much professional as personal. Also this change has implications for my blog in particular.In general, I’m not going to accept any invitations to do paid consultancy work nor to accept invitations to be a keynote speaker or a participant at conferences from now on. I will not be taking on any more thesis supervision or examinations, nor reviewing articles or books for publication, unless they are directly relevant to my own writing (see below). I say in general, because it’s stupid to be inflexible, but there will not be many exceptions. Read full article […]

  9. […] Time to retire from online learning? – by Tony Bates […]

  10. […] Read More: Time to retire from online learning? – Tony Bates […]

  11. […] Continue Reading: Time to retire from online learning? – Tony Bates […]

  12. […] Read the original: Time to retire from online learning? – Tony Bates […]

  13. […] que llevan muchos años trabajando en esto de la tecnología educativa -tan sólo hace falta ver el último artículo de Tony Bates en el que se despide, esperemos que puntualmente, de su faceta profesional-) y las […]

  14. […] we surfaced some radical ideas about teaching and learning.  In many ways, we aligned with what Tony Bates […]

  15. […] (as I obviously am, given the link on the right), you’ll have noticed his recent post ‘Time to retire from online learning?‘ No, he isn’t disappearing completely from the blogosphere, but is stopping most of his […]

  16. […] Tony Bates retiring from online learning […]

  17. […] in all things higher educational. And the media fell for it, hook, line and sinker. (Tony Bates, “Time to Retire from Online Learning?” April 15, […]

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