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  1. Clint Lalonde
    March 12, 2012 - 12:30 pm

    I wrote a post about the Periodic Table of Videos project a couple of years ago (http://clintlalonde.net/2008/12/18/when-chemistry-meets-youtube-you-get-reaction/) that looks like it would fit your first criteria wonderfully. I love the energy of the participants, and once you see the professor in action…well, he’s a bit of a character, which helps make the videos more interesting.

    The Periodic Table of Videos was put together by video journalist Brady Haran and Professor Martyn Poliakoff at the University of Nottingham. http://www.periodicvideos.com

    And a true OER to boot!

    • Tony Bates
      March 12, 2012 - 5:35 pm

      Thanks, Clint – great examples and a great post from you on the topic. It looks like the professor dropped sodium on his hair when he was washing it!

  2. […] Here Tony critiques on the pedagogical roles for videos in online learning, where he suggests the application of 3 criteria: […]

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  4. Colin Madland
    March 19, 2012 - 12:54 pm

    Hi Tony,

    Derek Muller is a Canadian who completed his PhD at the University of Sydney in Australia. The title of his dissertation is ‘Designing Effective Multimedia for Physics Education’ available at http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/super/theses/PhD(Muller).pdf.

    His findings are summarized very concisely at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiwsP9RnbZA.

    An example of one of his videos which I think meet the criteria for applications 2-6 and the parameters of your challenge would be http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGIZKETKKdw&list=PLDA442EA7EB0B8698&index=1&feature=plpp_video

    Another example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Stx6kLd9dYI&list=PLAC555EC7D3D0F4AA&index=8&feature=plpp_video

    A key pedagogical strategy that Muller employs is that he includes a discussion of common misconceptions in his videos, a practice in line with his findings that videos which address misconceptions, while more difficult to follow, are more effective at helping students attain learning outcomes compared to videos which do not.

    The only question I have is whether the videos at veritasium.com are open source…

    Cheers,
    Colin

    • Colin Madland
      March 19, 2012 - 12:57 pm

      It appears that the link to Muller’s dissertation didn’t come through properly…cut and paste the whole url to the end of ‘pdf’…

    • Tony Bates
      March 20, 2012 - 10:22 am

      Hi, Colin

      These are great examples. I was totally blown away by what happened when a tennis ball was hung on to the slinky and then dropped.

      However, it will be an interesting challenge for a teacher to ‘convert’ the videos into a ‘physics’ explanation. Your examples illustrate you can do physics at several different levels: observation, analysis and prediction. The challenge then is to move from the more surface ‘observation’, which these video do extremely well, to the deeper analysis and prediction. Somewhere in this process math is going to be needed!

      This again is a good example that often different media need to be used together for deep understanding to be achieved.

  5. No. 1 aha moment: media are different
    January 27, 2013 - 8:58 am

    […] A. (2012) Pedagogical roles for video in online learning, Online Learning and Distance Education […]

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